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15 Years Since the iPhone Announcement

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Fifteen years ago yesterday, Steve Jobs announced the iPhone and had a really good day. Granted back then the “figure out what Apple is making next” business wasn’t nearly so sophisticated, but he was truly able to pull a revolution out of his pocket.

Watching the Keynote again just reminds me how Steve was at the top of his game that day. The voice infections and the use of pauses and questions to create tension and then the release of that tension are all worthy of study if you speak in front of groups.

Every time I watch this Keynote, I also think of the Apple engineers in the audience that were doing shots of Scotch as their apps were demoed successfully (and didn’t crash). I wish we had video of that.

It also helps that the product he introduced was about to turn the world upside down.

The post 15 Years Since the iPhone Announcement appeared first on MacSparky.

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Belfong
3 days ago
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To this day, I remember very clearly about watching this announcement in my mother’s house and being blown away!
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How to tell your ‘career story’ in a way that lands you a new job

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Whether you’re interviewing, networking, or writing a cover letter, it’s all about crafting a compelling narrative. Here’s what to include.

If you’re looking for a new job this year, you’ll greatly improve your chances if you craft a narrative that tells your story clearly, honestly, and convincingly.

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Belfong
3 days ago
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malaysia
JayM
5 days ago
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Atlanta, GA
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The Case for ‘Mark as Unread’ in Messages

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Matthew Bischoff:

“Mark as Unread” has been so successful and well-loved in email that it’s been copied by many messaging apps like Facebook Messenger, WhatsApp, and Instagram. And its utility in a casual messaging context is much the same in the slightly more formal email context.

As Tine Welanly put it on Quora:

Let’s say you’re riding the bus and you open a message from a friend, maybe asking you about your plans for the weekend. You have to respond to that but maybe it’s your stop already or you don’t know yet. But if you don’t say anything now, you might forget to respond and then you’ll look like a bad friend. Not to mention you might miss out on some weekend fun.

But the most popular messaging app on iOS, Messages, has never implemented “Mark as Unread” even though users have been clamoring for it for years and it’s been rumored that they tested it. What’s even wilder is that iMessage doesn’t have any other in-app way for the user to signal that they need to return to a message in order to respond to it.

A big +1 from me for this request. I love Messages. I know there are a bunch of ways Apple could and should improve it, but I can’t think any single feature that I want more than “Mark as Unread”.

A situation I run into, somewhat frequently: I get a notification from Messages and tap it. Turns out it’s a message that will require a longer reply, or some sort of action on my part that I can’t or don’t want to do right now — like something I need to do on a Mac, but I’m using my iPhone. But the message has already been marked as read.

Link: matthewbischoff.com/mark-as-unread-for-messages/

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Belfong
4 days ago
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In WhatsApp, I pinned the message to the top. This can be done in iMessage too.
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Only Scale

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Several of you emailed me and expressed your disappointment over Bobby Kotick making an additional bajillion dollars because of the merger with Microsoft. 

I'm right there with you. 

I'm disappointed in my country for many reasons--most of them already documented here at some point--but one that I find particularly difficult to accept is that we have an economic system where morality is never, ever a factor. 

Morality is never rewarded in this country, only scale. 

Just think about that for a moment. Is doing the right thing ever even discussed? Not really. How often do you see a CEO get rewarded for taking a moral stance on anything?  Scale is rewarded, though, and massively. Just grow so big that you can crush everyone else, no matter how you do it, and you'll get paid.

Discouraging.

And if you want to ask "Why should morality have anything do with being a CEO?", I'd just ask you "Why not?"

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Belfong
4 days ago
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malaysia
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Avast Antivirus Software Sold Browsing History

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Nick Heer (in 2020):

Avast’s web browser extensions were caught collecting every website users were visiting for sale by its Jumpshot subsidiary. Those extensions were pulled and the company insisted that the information had no personal information attached[…]

[…]

Of course, Avast knows de-anonymization is trivial. That’s why it sells an anti-tracking product that explicitly promises to “disguise your online behavior so that no one can tell it’s you” for just $65 per year. That’s nice of Avast: it will sell your identity, and also sell you a product that promises to prevent companies from selling your identity.

[…]

Update: Avast has announced that they are shutting down Jumpshot.

Previously:

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Belfong
14 days ago
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malaysia
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China Calls This ‘Democracy.’ Hong Kongers Don’t Buy It.

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A majority of Hong Kongers has shunned the city’s first elections after Beijing arrested opposition politicians and imposed a “patriots”-only rule on the semi-autonomous territory’s electoral system.

Only 30.2 percent of Hong Kong’s 4.4 million voters cast a ballot on Sunday, a record low turnout for any citywide elections. This is despite the government’s efforts to encourage voting, including by offering free subway rides, sending text message reminders, and—for the first time—allowing Hong Kongers who live in mainland China to cast their votes in the southern city of Shenzhen. In comparison, 58.3 percent of eligible voters participated in the same legislative elections in 2016.

Pro-establishment candidates ended up winning 89 of the 90 of the seats in the Legislative Council, with the remaining one going to a self-identified centrist.

The elections used to be seen as a barometer of support for Beijing’s policy in Hong Kong after the former British colony was handed over to Chinese rule in 1997. For decades, the city’s pro-democracy opposition had enjoyed a slight but consistent majority over pro-Beijing lawmakers.

But the bulk of opposition leaders and lawmakers, including many who would have run, have been arrested under a national security crackdown following the 2019 anti-government demonstrations. And, in March, Beijing rewrote Hong Kong’s electoral system to give power to a vetting committee to screen out candidates deemed unpatriotic.

This means Beijing’s loyalists got to dominate the race, and many people simply did not bother to vote.

“There is no one I want to vote for,” said a 25-year-old social work student, who declined to be named for fear of government retaliation. He said he took advantage of the free public transport on Sunday to meet a friend.

The empty polling stations on Sunday came in sharp contrast with the long lines formed during the 2019 district elections, which saw a record high turnout of 71 percent in the midst of the protest movement. A majority voted for candidates who openly supported the protests, many of whom have since been imprisoned or disqualified from their posts.

A 27-year-old IT worker, who voted in 2019, said she did not participate in the Sunday elections because there was no candidate who could reflect her political stance. “I didn’t want to join this planned game,” she said. “The result had already been planned and was predictable.” 

She similarly declined to be named for fear of punishment. Local authorities previously arrested at least 10 people for calling for a boycott of the elections and issued arrest warrants for overseas activists. 

Pro-democracy advocates say the low turnout showed most Hong Kongers did not see the latest elections as a meaningful one. 

“Hong Kongers clearly did not buy the sham ‘patriots-only’ election on Sunday,” Campaign for Hong Kong, a Washington-based advocacy group, said in a statement. It called the elections “nothing more than a performative selection ritual fully controlled by Beijing.”

Despite the landslide victory by pro-Beijing candidates, authorities are struggling to argue that the winners actually enjoy a public mandate.

Hong Kong’s top official, Chief Executive Carrie Lam, said on Monday that the 1.4 million votes cast showed the election was an important one. She said the pro-establishment legislature would work better with the administration in solving economic and social problems.

On Monday, the Chinese State Council, China’s cabinet, called the Sunday elections a fair, secure, and corruption-free exercise of democracy in a new white paper on Hong Kong’s “democratic progress.” 

“Under British colonial rule, there was no democracy in Hong Kong,” the document proclaimed. “Any rational observer can clearly see that since Hong Kong’s return to China, its people have gained much greater access to political participation and enjoy more democratic rights than ever before. Democracy in Hong Kong is flourishing.”

Follow Viola Zhou on Twitter.



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Belfong
36 days ago
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malaysia
InShaneee
37 days ago
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Chicago, IL
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