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ThinkPad at 30

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Tim Bajarin, writing at Forbes:

In 1988, the father of the ThinkPad, Arimasa Naitoh, a Lenovo Fellow located in Japan, received a call about the need to spearhead a new portable computing venture in IBM’s research center in Yokohama, Japan. At the time, he was based in White Plains, NY but moved back to Japan to develop what has become the iconic ThinkPad line of portable computers.

I got to watch the development of the ThinkPad from the beginning. Mr Naitoh’s leadership, assisted by David Hill, who was instrumental in creating the unique ThinkPad design, made IBM at that time one of the most important portable computer companies in the market.

I may be a Mac guy, but I won’t lie, I’ve always loved ThinkPads.

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Belfong
61 days ago
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malaysia
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A Thought Experiment

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I woke up at 3 again this morning. I've been doing that lately. Then I'll lay away until about 5 and finally fall back to sleep. 

I think while I'm half-awake, though. Most of it doesn't make any sense, but every once in a while, something interesting sneaks through, and I'll send myself an email so I don't forget. 

What I thought about last night was the ratio of how much you think about the future versus thinking about the past. And how much you want to live in the future versus living in the past. 

When you're young, it's not a thing, because the answer is almost always heavily focused on the future. And you're happy, because the future seems unlimited. 

You get older. For many of us, the future seems dull in comparison to what we might have had, particularly in relationships. If you're in a difficult marriage, like Gloria and I were, it makes you look back and wonder. 

With Eli, though, I always looked forward to the future (still do), because wondrous things seem to happen on a daily basis. 

This week, though, I've been thinking more about the past, and my life before the accident, and if I'm honest, part of me wants to be back there, when I was still living in my little apartment and life was much lighter. Now there are times when it feels very, very heavy. 

I also know that it's my job to make my own life lighter. No one is going to do it for me. 

I'm guessing that people who always want to go into the future are the happiest, and people who always think about the past are the least happy. 

The difference in me now, after therapy, is that I'm conscious of these things. Before, I would have had no idea what was roiling around inside. Understanding is its own way of looking forward.

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Belfong
61 days ago
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malaysia
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Pictures!

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As a Coming Home I'm Glad You Survived The Year gift, I got Eli 21.0 this:

















That's the LEGO Starry Night set, and I only wish a two-dimensional photograph could do it justice, because it's amazing. The colors are so rich, and it's perfectly designed. The third dimension really makes the colors leap forward. 

Next, a phenomenal sky, and I think it's from Panama City? There have been so many countries that it's anyone's guess, really. 

















Finally, convincing proof of time travel:

















How did a WWI soldier get transported into an Australian Rules Football Game? I think we all know.
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Belfong
113 days ago
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I want that Lego Starry Night set!
malaysia
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How long will it take to understand long COVID?

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How long will it take to understand long COVID?

Enlarge (credit: niphon | Getty Images)

Rachel Robles contracted COVID in March 2020. The 27-year-old data analyst has not gone a single day without symptoms since. Most doctors did not believe her when she described how she had gone from running the Brooklyn Half Marathon the previous year to enduring such crippling fatigue that her couch felt like quicksand. How she suddenly struggled to put numbers together, despite her technical training. How no matter how many breaths she took, she always felt starved for air.

Three months in, one doctor told her, “COVID doesn’t last for 90 days. You either get over it or you die.”

That dichotomy—in which the only possible outcomes of COVID are either complete recovery or death—has turned out to be anything but true. Between 8 million and 23 million Americans are still sick months or years after being infected. The perplexing array of symptoms known as long COVID has left an estimated 1 million of those people so disabled they are unable to work, and those numbers are likely to grow as the virus continues to evolve and spread. Some who escaped long COVID the first time are getting it after their second or third infection. “It is a huge public health crisis in the wake of acute COVID infection,” says Linda Geng, a physician and codirector of Stanford Health Care’s long COVID clinic.

Read 37 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Belfong
113 days ago
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malaysia
JayM
116 days ago
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Atlanta, GA
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Nobody Wants to Work Anymore

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Belfong
138 days ago
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Interesting…..
malaysia
JayM
140 days ago
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Anymore been going on for a loooooooong time.
Atlanta, GA
138 days ago
It's almost like people don't actually want to do work for others just to survive. Weird, that
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M2 MacBook Air Reviews

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The initial reviews are in on the M2 MacBook Air. My two favorite are Jason Snell’s at Six Colors and Brian Heater at Tech Crunch. Overall, it seems that the M2 MacBook Air delivers on its promise. It’s a small, light Mac that can do most tasks, but isn’t built for heavy lifting. Having held one of these Macs, I really can’t understate how thin and light it feels. It reminds me of the first time I picked up an iPhone 5.

I’m reading a lot of hand-wringing about the thermal limits and throttling. I think this is getting blown out of proportion. IF you run a diagnostic at the MacBook Air designed to punish the processor, which is the lowest end Apple silicon chip combined with it’s substantial improvements over the M1 and the fact it doesn’t have a fan, it’s going to throttle. IF that is your normal workload, you should probably buy a MacBook Pro.

I’m much more interested in its performance for everyday Mac tasks – browsing, writing, email, and the likes. It seems the machine runs just fine for those tasks.

The post M2 MacBook Air Reviews appeared first on MacSparky.

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Belfong
144 days ago
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For normal task, why M2? Buy the $999 M1 MacBook Air.
malaysia
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